Round Rock New Neighbors is a social organization of women welcoming women in the Round Rock area since 1978. Both "new" and "old" neighbors are welcome. For more information: rrnewneighbors.org [Barnes & Noble requires that RRNN's book club be open to the public, so you do not need to be an RRNN member to attend book club, and both men and women are welcome and do attend. ]

Literary Events

Literary Events:

The Texas Book Festival, which will be the weekend of October 25th. A great annual event, different every time...fun to visit or volunteer. http://www.texasbookfestival.org/

The Friends of the Georgetown Library’s Hill Country Authors Series will feature novelist Ann Weisgarber on Monday, November 17, 2014 at 2 pm at the library. Doors open at 1:30 pm. Ann is the author of The Promise which will be featured on November 17. See article posted below for more details or go to http://www.folgeorgetown.com/web/

Friday, October 31, 2014

Book Club Enjoys Picture Book Narrated by 12-Year-Old

While reading The Collected Works of T.S. Spivet, by Reif Larsen, I just enjoyed the book and the illustrations. After our discussion and upon retrospect, I see the book as one of those that cross over from adolescent to adult; appropriate and interesting for everyone from a fairly young age through an advanced one! The feat of creating such a book is admirable. It's not sophomoric, the way a lot of movies about young adult relationships seem to me at my age, and yet I wouldn't hesitate to recommend it and might even give my copy to my 13-year-old great nephew, who reads and reads and reads over again.

A wonderful coincidence was that Kathleen joined our group recently and had experienced a small city celebrating The Collected Works with 28 days of events focused on the book! The town of Trumbull, Connecticut, chose this book in 2010, soon after it was published. The whole town was involved, with parties, fundraisers, discussions about the book, and analysis of the themes in the book, culminating in a day the author spent as a guest of the town. Kathleen showed us some brochures and schedules. Seems Trumbull went all out and had a lot of fun with T.S. Spivet!

Two themes that were addressed in Trumbull as well as at our meeting were the incidence of triads in the book and the question as to whether the book was autobiographical. Kathleen was the one who noticed the triads. She listed them. The list was a lot longer than what I was able to quickly note as she read them: the Trident Youth, 3 laws of motion, 3 books in the library about quantum mechanics, a 3-part series on a child prodigy, 3 suits for 3 press conferences, the 3-fingered Megatherium salute, and T.S. packing 3 of his notebooks for his trip to Washington, DC. Apparently the author, Reif Larsen, was surprised by the list of triads and could not take credit for spreading them throughout the book. His reaction to the plethora of triads was to remark that he might need to discuss this with a psychotherapist!

Larsen didn't tell the citizens of Trumbull much about his personal background, although it was clear that he was a young author and had been an intellectually gifted child. But he didn't have any personal anecdotes about hoboes or trains. Among the clever small print parts of the book are a list on the copyright page, as if part of the cataloging, of 27 subjects in the book, each of which is noted to be "fiction;" and on the very last page of the book, in the middle of a full-page abstract design, is a short sentence in similar tiny print that says, "Everything is fiction."

All who read the book, which seemed to be most or all of us present, enjoyed it. Some liked the sidebars and illustrations more than others did. Jay said they were like footnotes, and Cindy said they showed how the author's or T.S. Spivet's thought patterns. Carla nominated and presented the book and gave us 2 themes to think about: The book as a hero's quest in the spirit of Joseph Campbell, and the book as a parallel of The Wizard of Oz. Lots to enjoy and think about with this book. I still don't quite understand the Wormhole. Maybe I'm just too old for that!

A movie based on this story was released all over the world except in the United States and is called "The Young and Prodigious T.S. Spivet."


Friday, September 26, 2014

11/22/63 To Become an Online Video Series

http://io9.com/j-j-abrams-adapting-stephen-kings-time-travel-novel-11-1637734234

The link should bring up an article about the plan to bring 11/22/63 to life on Hulu.com  Hulu is a Netflix competitor. I guess it's to the public's advantage that they are both creating their own productions to stream via their websites.  A lot of Hulu is free, just go to hulu.com.  You might have to pay for this one. I think Hulu is $8.99/month.

Saturday, September 20, 2014

Still Alice

Still Alice is getting a lot of buzz as a movie to see.  No release date yet for the US, but is was shown at the Toronto Film Fesrival recently.
Reallly enjoyed the story. much more readable than I imagined.  Sorry I couldn't be there for the discussion.

Still Alice: Now a Major Motion Picture

I'm still laughing about Frank's comment that he hasn't yet seen a book cover that boasts, "Soon to Be a Minor Motion Picture!" Still Alice, the book we discussed this month, by Lisa Genova, is already a major motion picture, with Julianne Moore and Alec Baldwin in the two main roles. I didn't see any information about when it will be in the local theaters, but I saw a good review and a bad one. After our discussion and/or this posting, will you go see the movie? I'm not in a hurry to see it, but I will see it when it becomes convenient (Netflix or a group going at a convenient time that I can't resist...so please let me know!). The book is straightforward and educational, and it seems the movie is, too.

Almost everyone in the group that met at Barnes & Noble last Monday to discuss Still Alice had experience with Alzheimer's in a family member or close friend. Perhaps the book and the meeting were most attractive to people who were familiar with the ravages of Alzheimer's, or perhaps the percentages are that way among everyone. Our discussion included personal sharing, which I will not include here. #youhadtobethere.

We had a little fun discussing the symptoms of Alzheimer's and the tests that are used for diagnosis. I say it was fun because, from what we said, we could see that that our memory lapses in general are very common among us and also much less dramatic than the kinds of problems that indicate the likelihood of a diagnosis. We decided to agree that problems dredging up words and people's names, temporarily losing car keys or eyeglasses, and other errors a lot of us have made are caused by normal tiredness, filled brains from many years of high intellectual pursuit, busy lives, and fragmented messages among the barrage of multimedia aspects of daily life. #thanks Obama

The group thought well of the book, finding it difficult emotionally but a compelling story. Vicki mentioned that she liked the way the book stemmed from the patient's point-of-view. She also pointed out that because of this emphasis on the patient running the story, the reader never knew for sure how much the family talked about Alice when she wasn't there; the reader saw only the family's final decisions and interactions with Alice rather than their perhaps long and difficult deliberations among themselves. Marsha said it was a "graceful" book even though the reader knew what would happen. Shirley thought it interesting that the daughter who was fighting with Alice in the beginning of the book ended up being the one who most understood her mother. Cindy T. noted that there is a stigma to dementia that is different from such potentially curable diseases as cancer: cancer patients are considered brave and heroic and hopeful and have access to support groups; whereas Alice had to create her own support group for people suffering from early Alzheimer's.

Toward the end of the meeting, some local resources were mentioned. Marsha told us about a friend who works with Alzheimer's patients at a facility that has a take-apart room and a put-together room. In the morning, patients who like to take things apart go to the room and take things apart. In the afternoon, patients who like to put things together go to that room! (I'm not sure this is local, but what an idea!) Pam mentioned the Community Health Paramedic program in Round Rock. Patty mentioned a support group for Alzheimer's caregivers at her church. Several local churches apparently have groups, and they are very helpful. Dennis mentioned that there are some cognitive tests available online.


Thanks to Shirley for nominating this different and daring book and for guiding our discussion but also allowing us to diverge as much as we wanted. Thumbs up to everyone in our group who is currently a caregiver for a loved one with dementia. 

Tuesday, September 9, 2014

Leo Tolstoy

Today is Tolstoy's birthday. In his honor, let's all of us re-read War and Peace today!

Tuesday, September 2, 2014

Author Ann Weisgarber Visits Georgetown Public Library - About her Historical Novel of Galveston

The Promise is shortlisted for the United Kingdom’s Walter Scott Prize in Historical Fiction and is a Spur Award finalist in the United States.  She wrote much of the novel in Galveston where pelicans glide along the surf and cows graze in pastures.  Here is how she describes the genesis of the novel:
“When I finished my first novel, The Personal History of Rachel DuPree, I signed on to write a monthly article for The Islander, a Galveston-based magazine.  …It was an interview with a brother and sister on the west end of the island that eventually inspired me to write The Promise.  Like many who live along or near the Texas Gulf Coast, I was fascinated by the 1900 Storm, the worst U.S. natural disaster of the 20th Century.  If Galveston’s west end was isolated in 1963, what was it like during 1900?  Did people live there then?  If so, who were they?  Did they survive the storm?  The Promise is my tribute to the women, men, and children who lived down the island on September 8, 1900.”
The Promise has received many glowing critical reviews.  Among them are:
“…. the story is nuanced, psychologically sensitive, detailed and highly visual. … moves at a rhythmic pace that constantly tugs at readers.  The characters, setting and plot synchronize perfectly. …the drama flows naturally from the story’s style …. brims with themes and conflicts that balance and deepen the novel — man vs. nature, the individual vs. society, struggles with honesty, and colliding religious beliefs and moral standards. …This is fiction from a gifted author who knows the territory.” – David Hendricks, San Antonio Express-News
The depth of each character, particularly the two women that make up the focus of the story, is phenomenal.  The author brings the reader right into the fears and motivations of each woman, and it makes for what is easily the best first-person narrative I’ve been fortunate enough to read.  Not only are the characters detailed, but so is the setting.  Weisgarber makes Texas come alive in a way that few authors could.” - Christie Spurlock, San Francisco Book Review
Ann was born and raised in Kettering, Ohio, a suburb of Dayton.  She graduated from Wright State University in Dayton with a Bachelor of Arts in Social Work and earned a Master of Arts in Sociology from the University of Houston.  She has been a social worker in psychiatric and nursing home facilities, and taught sociology at Wharton County Junior College in Texas.  She now splits her time between Sugar Land, Texas, and Galveston.  She and her husband, Rob, are fans of America’s national parks and visit at least one park a year.
Ann serves on the selection committee for the Langum Prize in American Historical Fiction.  She is currently working on her next novel that takes place in Capitol Reef National Park, Utah, during the winter of 1888.
Tickets for the event are $15 in advance and $18 at the door, and may be purchased starting Wednesday, October 1, at the Second-Hand Prose bookstore on the second floor of the library or by contacting Marcy Lowe at 512-868-8974.  A dessert from the Red Poppy CafĂ© in the library will be served with the presentation.  The library is located at 402 W. 8th Street in Georgetown.
If members of your book club would like to attend as a group, we’ll be happy to reserve space for you if you will let us know how many tickets have been purchased.  One of your members should arrive by 1:45, soon after the doors open, to hold your table reservation, so that other attendees do not inadvertently sit there.  If you’d like to reserve seats for your club, please contact Marcy Lowe at the email address or phone shown below.

All proceeds will go toward meeting unfunded requirements of the library.  For FY 2012-13 the Friends of the Library donated over $40,000 to fund unbudgeted needs.

Contact:
Marcy Lowe

512-868-8974

Sunday, August 24, 2014

Miracles Flow in Peace Like a River

As we dug into the depths of Peace Like a River, by Leif Enger, one theme seemed to surface most often: Miracles. This book was full of miracles, which our readers considered and explained in all sorts of ways. Marsha led us through our discussion, which seemed to keep circling around to one or another miracle as part of the plot or subplot. She told us that the author grew up with parents who had strong Christian beliefs but were not outwardly religious and did not go to church. This family attitude was similar to that of the family depicted in the story. This book is considered a mainstream novel, not in the strictly Christian genre, but is accepted by many Christians as a religious testament. Looking at reviews of the book and searching online, it is obvious that this is yet another book that our group has chosen that could easily fill a semester of college-level interpretation. Think what fun you might have had writing a semester paper about this one!

Miracles in Peace Like a River begin with the narrator's birth: Reuben almost died at birth, and it was his father, Jeremiah's, strength of faith that kept him alive. That is the implication. We batted it around a bit. Reuben didn't breathe for 12 minutes, which pushes the usual 10-minute envelope for brain damage; it seems within the realm of possibility but also what most of us would call a miracle.  With such a beginning and a character named "Jeremiah," 6 members at the meeting said that the beginning of the book made them expect proselytizing in the book. All said they didn't find that to happen and that they liked the book. Once again, our book club members powered through the part that might cause them to put the book down if they weren't reading for book discussion, and were rewarded for it!

When we talked about Jeremiah walking on air, Ken noted that this was seen through Reuben's eyes. Janice suggested that Reuben saw miracles and that was why there were miracles. Pam thought that Reuben would be likely to see his father as miraculous because he knew the story of the miracle his father supposedly performed at his birth. So these ideas begged the question as to whether the miracles in the book were meant to be taken literally.

When Amy brought up the question as to why Jeremiah healed the (undeserving but who am I to judge?) superintendent of his boils but did not heal own son's asthma, we got into the idea of Jeremiah having no control over his healing gift. Thus, the gift became both more realistic but also more potentially stemming from a power beyond the literal world. Carla then brought up the idea of the book as having Biblical allegorical qualities, such as Jeremiah turning the other cheek in his seeming decision to heal the superintendent, even as the superintendent was firing him from his job unreasonably. I was disappointed that the superintendent didn't change his tune at the time of the healing...but with miracles, it can take some time to sink in. Carla also suggested that when Reuben was having the asthma attack while wrestling with keeping the secret of Davy's whereabouts; Reuben's dream of a nasty little man on his chest might represent the devil.

The theme of Biblical allegory continued to surface in tandem with the miracles in our discussion. Ken agreed that the book had Biblical parallels, giving the examples of the walking on air correlating with walking on water, and the laying on of hands as a Biblical healing. Later Ken, in my humble opinion, clinched the Biblical allegory theory by suggesting that the heaven scene, where Jeremiah, the father, sacrificed his life to save his son, was opposite but certainly closely parallel to the story of the sacrifice of Jesus' life.

We covered other questions and answers in this simple-to-read but complex-to-understand novel. Another great live discussion, enjoyed by all!