Round Rock New Neighbors is a social organization of women welcoming women in the Round Rock area since 1978. Both "new" and "old" neighbors are welcome. For more information: rrnewneighbors.org [Barnes & Noble requires that RRNN's book club be open to the public, so you do not need to be an RRNN member to attend book club, and both men and women are welcome and do attend. ]

Literary Events

Literary Events

What's New?__________


July 6th, author Neil Gaiman will speak at the Long Center. $32.
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Thanks to Cindy V. for sending me listings of 2 TV series you might find interesting, and you might have access to:

The Son (book by Philipp Meyer), starring Pierce Brosnan. On AMC starting April 8.

American Gods (book by Neil Gaiman) on Starz, starting April 30.
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The Friends of the Georgetown Public Library’s Hill Country Authors Series will feature Texas author Paulette Jiles discussing her upcoming novel News of the World, which was shortlisted for the 2016 National Book Award for Fiction.
WHEN: Thursday, May 11, 2017, at 2 pm. Doors open at 1:30 pm.
WHERE: The Georgetown Public Library, 402 W. 8th Street in Georgetown, Texas.
WHY: All proceeds from the event will go toward meeting unfunded projects of the library. Tickets for the event are $15 in advance or $18 at the door, and may be purchased starting April 3, 2017, at the Second-Hand Prose bookstore on the second floor of the library, online at folgeorgetown.org/calendar, or by contacting Marcy Lowe at 512-868-8974. A dessert and beverage from the Red Poppy Café in the library will be served.
THE BOOK: In 1870 a 10-year-old girls makes a journey back to her aunt and uncle’s home after living with Kiowa warriors who had killed her parents four year earlier. Subsequently she is traded to Capt. Jefferson Kyle Kidd, a 70-year-old war veteran, who takes her 400 miles to her family near San Antonio.
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Round Rock Public Library Book Group meets Tuesday May 16th 7:00-8:30. They will discuss Billy Lynn's Long Halftime Walk, by Ben Fountain. They will be voting on future book choices. Check the library website for more information, or ask Carla.
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Book Buzz - June 6th, evening - Round Rock Public Library - Free, but seating is limited. Reservations are necessary and will open closer to the time of the event.

Saturday, September 20, 2014

Still Alice: Now a Major Motion Picture

I'm still laughing about Frank's comment that he hasn't yet seen a book cover that boasts, "Soon to Be a Minor Motion Picture!" Still Alice, the book we discussed this month, by Lisa Genova, is already a major motion picture, with Julianne Moore and Alec Baldwin in the two main roles. I didn't see any information about when it will be in the local theaters, but I saw a good review and a bad one. After our discussion and/or this posting, will you go see the movie? I'm not in a hurry to see it, but I will see it when it becomes convenient (Netflix or a group going at a convenient time that I can't resist...so please let me know!). The book is straightforward and educational, and it seems the movie is, too.

Almost everyone in the group that met at Barnes & Noble last Monday to discuss Still Alice had experience with Alzheimer's in a family member or close friend. Perhaps the book and the meeting were most attractive to people who were familiar with the ravages of Alzheimer's, or perhaps the percentages are that way among everyone. Our discussion included personal sharing, which I will not include here. #youhadtobethere.

We had a little fun discussing the symptoms of Alzheimer's and the tests that are used for diagnosis. I say it was fun because, from what we said, we could see that that our memory lapses in general are very common among us and also much less dramatic than the kinds of problems that indicate the likelihood of a diagnosis. We decided to agree that problems dredging up words and people's names, temporarily losing car keys or eyeglasses, and other errors a lot of us have made are caused by normal tiredness, filled brains from many years of high intellectual pursuit, busy lives, and fragmented messages among the barrage of multimedia aspects of daily life. #thanks Obama

The group thought well of the book, finding it difficult emotionally but a compelling story. Vicki mentioned that she liked the way the book stemmed from the patient's point-of-view. She also pointed out that because of this emphasis on the patient running the story, the reader never knew for sure how much the family talked about Alice when she wasn't there; the reader saw only the family's final decisions and interactions with Alice rather than their perhaps long and difficult deliberations among themselves. Marsha said it was a "graceful" book even though the reader knew what would happen. Shirley thought it interesting that the daughter who was fighting with Alice in the beginning of the book ended up being the one who most understood her mother. Cindy T. noted that there is a stigma to dementia that is different from such potentially curable diseases as cancer: cancer patients are considered brave and heroic and hopeful and have access to support groups; whereas Alice had to create her own support group for people suffering from early Alzheimer's.

Toward the end of the meeting, some local resources were mentioned. Marsha told us about a friend who works with Alzheimer's patients at a facility that has a take-apart room and a put-together room. In the morning, patients who like to take things apart go to the room and take things apart. In the afternoon, patients who like to put things together go to that room! (I'm not sure this is local, but what an idea!) Pam mentioned the Community Health Paramedic program in Round Rock. Patty mentioned a support group for Alzheimer's caregivers at her church. Several local churches apparently have groups, and they are very helpful. Dennis mentioned that there are some cognitive tests available online.


Thanks to Shirley for nominating this different and daring book and for guiding our discussion but also allowing us to diverge as much as we wanted. Thumbs up to everyone in our group who is currently a caregiver for a loved one with dementia. 

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